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Authors: D. GARCIA-RAMIREZ, N. HA, L. YAO, K. A. SCHMIDT, S. F. GISZTER, K. J. DOUGHERTY Lab Abstract: “Neuronal circuitry generating locomotion is located in the thoracolumbar spinal cord. Spinal rhythm generating interneurons (INs) convert descending inputs into rhythmic outputs. … Continue reading

Spinal implant helps three paralysed men walk again By Pallab Ghosh Science correspondent, BBC News “Three paralysed men, who were told they would spend the rest of their lives in a wheelchair, are able to walk again thanks to doctors … Continue reading

This is just a quick note to alert you of yet another easy way you can support U2FP. Now through November 2, AmazonSmile is donating 5% (ten times the usual amount) to Unite 2 Fight Paralysis when you shop at this link: smile.amazon.com/ch/20-3528000. It's that simple - just buy what you were already planning to get on Amazon through the above link (or use it as an excuse to justify that impluse-buy you couldn't quite bring yourself to make).

Read about the neuroprosthetic advancement at MEDGADGETS: “Scientists at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland have created a special device to be able to stimulate and record signals from and to peripheral nerve fibers on a specialty … Continue reading

We did it! Last Wednesday, October 17th, at approximately 8:45pm EST the $1,000,000 Pennsylvania Spinal Cord Injury Research Bill (SB31/HB385) went to the floor of the PA House for a final vote and PASSED into Law!

I can't say it enough - Thank You! I'm incredibly grateful to:
- Our Sponsors. And especially our Title Sponsor, The Rick Hansen Institute - for helping to underwrite this year's Symposium and providing much needed resources to make Working 2 Walk accessible and affordable to the SCI Community.
- Our Presenters. Each of our scientific and advocacy speakers brought a unique perspective to the table, which in turn fueled our table discussions and broadened our ideas of what is ...

Neural Regeneration Research Journal Authors: Philippa Mary Warren, Amanda Phuong Tran, and Jerry Silver, Ph.D. “In our recently co-authored Physiological Reviews manuscript entitled “The biology of regeneration failure and success after spinal cord injury” (Tran et al., 2018b), we sought … Continue reading

Thanks for reading, all of you who are following from Canada, the USA, the UK, Belgium, India, Italy, Ireland, Israel, Pakistan, and Russia. I hope you found something challenging and useful in these posts; the conference can be challenging, and these little posts barely get at the substance of what happens here, either in terms of... Continue Reading →

David is going through a quick recap of what has been presented since lunch. He says he’d like to open this by talking about funding, especially as it relates to talking about the broken system for paying for rehab. One of the small things we’ve done by way of persuading the government to spend money... Continue Reading →

Thanks, Matthew for the invitation to be here today. I’d like to remind you of the Power of One. We’re all here today because of Marilyn Smith. Her son Noah was injured in 2003, and her response to that is why we’re here. (Applause, amen.) Sarah, Luke, Kylie, James (he shows their pictures, along with... Continue Reading →

Acute Intermittent Hypoxia: A Scientific and Personal Odyssey Take home messages (do them first so we can follow along!) Acute intermittent hypoxia shows great promise to improve many motor functions in chronic sci. Everybody has a role in making this happen. I’m a physical activity guy who was looking for a dream job when I... Continue Reading →

I’ve tried to compress two topics into one talk … first I’m going to talk about training — and you see the small print “in animal models.” We’re starting with Rehab in Rats. Why study this? I want to understand what happens in the nervous system when it uses training to recover. We used to... Continue Reading →

Question: I was talking with one of the women in the ESTAND trial and she was showing me how she uses her phone app to trigger the device. Is this something that could be done w/respect to BB&S? It’s our vision that any of these approaches should come with a good technology that allows you... Continue Reading →

Matt tells a story about a legislative meeting he had during the effort to get funding through the Pennsylvania legislature. He’d just heard the good news that one of the subjects in the Krassioukov trials had recovered the ability to have an orgasm after almost six years post injury. Thinking it would be the sort... Continue Reading →

Matt: Here’s a story for you. U2FP used to have a board member with a C7 injury. His name was Dave, and he was a dedicated quad rugby player. He and I used to talk about how hard it was for him to get his rugby friends to care about research. The light came on... Continue Reading →

The bladder is a very complex system … We look at this (SCI research) as a sort of buffet; there’s lots of things that can help right now. I have patients coming in who think they want to wait for the stem cell treatment that will get them tap dancing, but from my perspective they’re... Continue Reading →

Question: Speaker is outlining a bunch work in this area that’s ongoing in Canada and asking for collaboration with researchers in the USA. Dennis: Fantastic. Question/comment: Kim Anderson herself says that there’s a new survey. It appears that bladder and bowel functionality does impact sexual function. Suggests to Neilsen that scientists can be asked to... Continue Reading →

Thanks for having me here. I’ve been asked to talk, but I’m here to listen. This is a brilliant conference, and we’ll be taking a lot of these lessons back to our own meetings. A lot of what we hear from you does go back to our meetings. I’m going to present some data from... Continue Reading →

Thank you for inviting me — this has been an amazing event. I enjoyed our table conversations yesterday. My background is in neuroscience and I worked on a bunch of technology before going to Neilsen. My goal today is to share some info about the foundation, and to give you some insight into what it’s... Continue Reading →

Matt: Good morning! Most of you came back! (He’s right. The room is just as full today as yesterday, which might be due the wise choice to have us start at 9 instead of 8 … the bar scene went on for a while last night.) Matt: I want to revisit something … it’s so... Continue Reading →

The man himself. He rolls himself up a very steep incline to get to the podium, jokes about how this wouldn’t meet the ADA specs. I’ve been on this journey for a little while, and ultimately I’m incredibly blown away by the evolution … looking back, you would never see a room like this 30... Continue Reading →

Lyn Jakeman will moderate again. This time she’s joined by Brian Kwon, Wolfram Tetzlaff, and Karim Fouad She starts by talking about how the scientific community — having studied regeneration for decades — is in a strange place relative to that focus. Lots of work, lots of time, lots of careers … and not much... Continue Reading →

He can’t hear the first question, blames it on Led Zeppelin in the summer of 1969 … person repeats it: What about improving myelin from dietary changes? (Apparently this is a thing) He says it’s a very good question that needs more study. This makes me slightly crazy. Improving myelin needs more study?! I get... Continue Reading →

Ah, a  German accent … plus, a little mixup in the understanding of the program agenda. I thought I would be talking next to someone talking about cell transplant .. But no. The title of this talk is Locomotor Recovery Following Moderate or Severe Contusive SCI Does Not Require Oligodendrocyte Remyelination. (And that’s not just... Continue Reading →

For 40 years, we’ve been looking at interventions, most of which have failed. Do you have biomarkers for chronic injuries? That’s a hard question … (he says a lot of words that add up to) “We’re not doing very much in that area right now.” (missed the question sorry) What we want to do in... Continue Reading →

He’s a very well-spoken, able-bodied guy — comes across like a man who is used to speaking to people with money, tho’ I probably couldn’t say exactly what I mean by that. Self-assurance is part of it, along with the sense that everything he says has been very, very thoroughly thought through. He welcomes us... Continue Reading →

How do we build in time and money for researchers to do the next thing? We all know that their incentive is to just do more research. It’s what pays the bills. Change is very hard, and the research ecosystem is very big … but it’s coming. For researchers, the incentive is to do something... Continue Reading →

The Breadcrumb Path from Bench to Bedside Lyn is very appealing. That’s really the only word to describe this woman. She’s able-bodied and energetic, full of curiosity and good will. She smiles easily; also, when she’s focused on making a point, you realize that there’s a very clear mind at work. She describes her background:... Continue Reading →

We introduce ourselves. What we’ve been given is a set of questions. We’re asked to work our way through them, with a volunteer facilitator and a volunteer note-taker. Later the whole group plus the panel will talk about these discussions. One member starts by talking about her company that’s developing a full range of motion... Continue Reading →

Q and A for Megan Has epistim been shown to improve hand function? Yes! Look at Chet Moritz’s work. Congratulations for doing that replication study! You validated the work of the Louisville team, which was a giant step forward. (He’s taking a very long time to ask the following:) Why don’t we work on crawling?... Continue Reading →

Matt introduces her: Our next speaker is Dr. Megan Gill from the Mayo Clinic. A couple of weeks ago there was an explosion of press about her work, along with that of researchers from the Louisville lab. This is the epidural stimulation all your friends have been talking about. Matt’s reminder: If it’s not clear... Continue Reading →

Are any of the PTs that you know doing this on patients? I was put on a tilt table 3 days out of ICU, and I was on a vent. This was in Germany decades ago. Why are we playing around with rats when this should be happening to people in the acute phase? We... Continue Reading →

David is a mild-mannered able-bodied person with a very calm and measured way of speaking. You can tell that he also has a wicked sense of humor. His talk is called Activity and Physical Therapy after Incomplete SCI in the Rat  (Aside from me … okay, I like this because it’s about incomplete injuries and... Continue Reading →

Can you profile patients to see who will respond to this and who will not? There is no profile like that. We know that even in injuries classified as ASIA A — motor and sensory complete — there are surviving fibers. They’re just asleep. I understand the goal is to implant 100 people … so... Continue Reading →

He turns out to be a burly able-bodied guy with a distinct Russian accent. His talk is called Spinal Cord Neuromodulation for Restoration of Autonomic Cardiovascular Function in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury How’s that for a mouthful? What he’s going to give us is an update from the ESTAND trial — for those who... Continue Reading →

Barry Munro wheels up to take the microphone. I’ve been injured for 31 years, and I’ve been on this journey for a long time. We all share a common journey together. I wanted to look back at where we’ve been as a community, about lessons learned, starting with what happened to me. August 1987, I... Continue Reading →

New this year: breakfast served on actual PLATES, at your seat, right where you’re going to listen to the speakers throughout the day! We’ve always had to go muddle through a buffet style continental spread, get the various plates and cups and utensils back to our tables, and then pick at it as fast as... Continue Reading →

So, Bruce and I left Seattle at 1:30 this afternoon, and a couple of hours later we were parking the car in Vancouver. We schlepped our stuff up to the hotel room, looked at each other and said, “Damn. Why do we ever fly anywhere? That was easy.” Of course the day did involve sharing... Continue Reading →

Dr. Francisco Benavides from Miami Project explains the neuroplasticity experiments taking place at Miami Project.

Without your calls and letters (including those from the Reeve Foundation and United Spinal that were sent in solidarity with our PA advocates) we wouldn't be here.

Now we're asking you to tell your own story. Without that continued show of support from the SCI Community, there's still a chance our bill could be sidelined by an amendment during the final vote.

Dr. Kendall Lee, neurosurgeon and director of Mayo Clinic’s Neural Engineering Laboratories, covers two topics – deep brain stimulation surgery and the latest update on spinal cord injury research (at 10:00 min) from the neurosurgeon’s perspective. Rehabilitation for spinal cord … Continue reading

“This review summarizes different approaches to electrical stimulation of the spinal cord designed to restore motor function, with a brief discussion of their origins and the current understanding of their mechanisms of action.” Therapeutic Stimulation for Restoration of Function After … Continue reading

Today is the day: the $1M SCI Research Bill our Pennsylvania advocates have worked tirelessly to advance (Senate Bill 31) is up for a vote in the House Human Services (HHS) committee this afternoon. It must pass out of the HHS committee in order to be put to a final vote on the House floor. Let’s make the best of the next few hours and push this legislation over one of the final hurdles. Please pick up the phone!

We've talked a lot about how we want the SCI Community to be in the driver's seat when it comes to conversations around curative therapies. It's why a central component of our C.A.N. initiative is crafting legislation that requires having the SCI Community at the decision-making table.

From the UCLA Newsroom “The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA has received a $3 million gift from The Louis and Harold Price Foundation to support the spinal cord work of Dr. Daniel Lu, associate professor of neurosurgery and … Continue reading

We're entering the homestretch ahead of Working 2 Walk - just under 2 weeks left to register online. The excitement continues to build as the pieces fall into place: from our first-class line-up of presenters to our interactive agenda that will allow more time for critical engagement, to the formal and organic connections that are made within the SCI Community.

I’m weak minded and have bad genes. But let me back up. For those of you who are not aware, one of our initiatives here at U2FP is organizing a team of runners and wheelers in the Chicago Marathon every year. This year, I’m joining Team U2FP - as a participant - to raise funds in support of our work. If you’ve met me you’ll understand why I’ve been giving folks the opening disclaimer: I have the genes predisposed to raiding a 9th century Northern European village, wearing a bear skin ...

CAMBRIDGE, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–BioAxone BioSciences, Inc. announced today the receipt of a Fast-Track grant (R44 NS110290-01) from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health, as part of the agency’s Small Business Innovation … Continue reading

Unless you’ve been living off the grid AND under a proverbial rock, you’ve no doubt seen the multiple news reports regarding the ongoing Epidural Stimulation studies at the University of Louisville and the Mayo Clinic. The reports are based on these articles in the New England Journal of Medicine & Nature (the latter includes Megan Gill as one of its authors, a presenter at this year's Working 2 Walk Symposium). It's encouraging news, and has certainly captured the media spotlight.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy have helped a man paralyzed since 2013 regain his ability to stand and walk with assistance. The results, achieved in a research collaboration between Mayo Clinic and UCLA, are reported in Nature … Continue reading